The Giant Bird That Got Lost When Camels Roamed North 2 days ago   08:55

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PBS Eons
The California condor is the biggest flying bird in North America, a title that it has held since the Late Pleistocene Epoch. It's just one example of an organism that we share the planet with today that seems lost in time, out of place in our world.

Thanks as always to Studio 252mya for their wonderful paleoart. You can check out more of their work here: https://252mya.com

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios

Super special thanks to the following Patreon patrons for helping make Eons possible:

Katie Fichtner, Anthony Callaghan, XULIN GE, Po Foon Kwong, Larry Wilson, Merri Snaidman, Renzo Caimi, Ordenes, John Vanek, Neil H. Gray, Marilyn Wolmart, Esmeralda Rupp-Spangle, Gregory Donovan, Ehit Dinesh Agarwal, الخليفي سلطان, Gabriel Cortez, Marcus Lejon, Robert Arévalo, Robert Hill, Kelby Reid, Todd Dittman, Betsy Radley, PS, Philip Slingerland, Jose Garcia, Eric Vonk, Tony Wamsley, Henrik Peteri, Jonathan Wright, Jon Monteiro, James Bording, Brad Nicholls, Miles Chaston, Michael McClellan, Jeff Graham, Maria Humphrey, Nathan Paskett, Connor Jensen, Daisuke Goto, Hubert Rady, Gregory Kintz, Tyson Cleary, Chandler Bass, Maly Lor, Joao Ascensao, Tsee Lee, Sarah Fritts, Ron Harvey Jr, Jacob Gerke, Alex Yan

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References: https://bit.ly/2HdL2V7
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Comments 1194 Comments

Caesar
2:10 I thought that he said Tyrion
daddyofour
Bruh what about the chilean Condor
Sylkis89
Interestingly, all rainforests are examples of entire ecosystems that are lost in time and no longer fit the modern environment on the planet... they couldn't develop during the ice ages it was way back when the planet was hot and all of the land including the poles was all a massive jungle... and later on when the climate cooled down most of it disappeared with just small chunks in the tropics remaining... and which is why a rainforest cannot recover after being cut down and why it's so detrimental the deforestation of Amazon and such especially with their globally stabilising role with the weather being much more aggressive hadn't it been for their regulatory moisturising effect on the planet's scale... but lol maybe with the global warming when we reach temps high enough on the poles it will grow back, given the temperature grows slow enough not to just wipe out all the life on the way before the forests manage to expand...
Danielle E.
Thank you.
Erik Iacopelli
the condors in captivity. How do they feed them? Give then raw fresh meat or do they let it start to rot first?
Erik Iacopelli
we r the reason, Humans just love killing things off
J-Man88UK
And what do we do? Capture them and put numbers on them. Go humans.
Matthew
Very cool! Never knew this about the California Condor. Looking forward to learning about other "lost in time" animals that are best adapted for extinct ecosystems.
Emyr Lewis
Donate the dead ? Could provide a extra food recourse. Better than pumping them with formaldehyde and shoving them in the ground. No need for such poisons
FalschRum
When you show those great reconstructions of how long extinct animals might have looked like I always wonder if you could reconstruct the sounds that they made. Could you maybe make an episode about that? :)
B.Y.E.
Proghorns are definitely the fastest things I've ever seen...I was driving 100 Km/hr in Saskatchewan alongside a herd going about the same speed.or faster.
theDarksunsShine
Extraordinary video but I have just one question: How and where did you, friends, come across the conclusion that pronghorns can achieve 60mph? That seems a bit...exaggerated.
Dawn Allen
Evolution of the platypus
dwon da
4:48 Killed me. 😂😂😂 “Way faster than it needs to be.”
Walston Stone
This will probably extinct like Ho-oh I used to see Ho-oh near my house
William Hammonds
Could you do a video on the evolution, rise, and diversity of the Hadrosauridae family of dinosaurs? They are my favorite and would love to know more about them.
AirIUnderwater
I came here for knowledge, but got feels instead. :(
Sol Soman
Hi you should do a video on the giant "Water King" penguin!
Sedithke
This one is among the most interesting episodes of the series! Thank you!
AMLIfied
Amazing to think that they managed to rebound back from a population of only 23. At those numbers it would have been all too easy for their lineage to end right there. I can think of several animals that were similarly attempted to be preserved, like several species of rhinos, or more relatable for me the Tasmanian tiger (granted this was back in the 30s), but with diminishing results until extinction.
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When Camels Roamed North The Giant Bird That Got Lost 2 days ago   10:12

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Camels are famous for adaptations that have allowed them to flourish where most other large mammals would perish. But their story begins over 40 million years ago in North America, and in an environment you’d never expect: a rainforest.  

Special thanks to Julio Lacerda, WillemSvdMerwe, and Ryan Somma for allowing us to use their images in this episode!

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios

Super special thanks to the following Patreon patrons for helping make Eons possible:

Katie Fichtner, Aldo Espinosa Zúñiga, Anthony Callaghan, Esmeralda Rupp-Spangle, Gregory Donovan, Ehit Dinesh Agarwal, الخليفي سلطان, Gabriel Cortez, Marcus Lejon, Anel Salas, Robert Arévalo, Robert Hill, Kelby Reid, Todd Dittman, Betsy Radley, PS, Colin Sylvester, Philip Slingerland, John Vanek, Jose Garcia, Noah offitzer, Eric Vonk, Tony Wamsley, Henrik Peteri, Jonathan Wright, Jon Monteiro, James Bording, Brad Nicholls, Miles Chaston, Michael McClellan, Jeff Graham, Maria Humphrey, Nathan Paskett, Connor Jensen, Sapjes, Daisuke Goto, Hubert Rady, Yuntao Zhou, Gregory Kintz, Tyson Cleary, Chandler Bass, Maly Lor, Joao Ascensao, Tsee Lee, Sarah Fritts, Ruben Winter, Ron Harvey Jr, Jacob Gerke, Alex Yan

If you'd like to support the channel, head over to http://patreon.com/eons and pledge for some cool rewards!

Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow
Twitter - https://twitter.com/eonsshow
Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eonsshow/

References:
https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/1304168.pdf
https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/1979
https://books.google.com/books?id=I-RgojcDyWYC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q=camel&f=false
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1365-2052.2008.01848.x
https://www.jstor.org/stable/4524199
https://books.google.com/books?id=DWtCw6-AxA8C&pg=PA136&lpg=PA136&dq=camel&source=bl&ots=gUrNWj3psO&sig=YpvjEov5zpTUcSbrZFfDkoTrhFo&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj_5siqvJreAhVMIDQIHSkpCaEQ6AEwC3oECAQQAQ#v=onepage&q=camel&f=false
https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=NGFaAAAAYAAJ&hl=en&pg=GBS.PA110
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/003101827990141X
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12052-009-0136-1
https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms2516.pdf
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018210003202
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/966f/07eaaa19190b2a5db86657bfb00764d8c463.pdf#page=76
http://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/early/2015/03/18/1420650112.full.pdf
https://paleobiodb.org/classic/checkTaxonInfo?taxon_no=42514&is_real_user=1

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