How did NASA Steer the Saturn V?- Smarter America's Iron Giants - The World's 2 days ago   14:21

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Behind the Scenes: https://ufl.ae/videow/6cCA6yIPiQi

View Linus's video: https://ufl.ae/videow/ebHV5Saqwq0

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Functional Requirements for the Launch Vechile Digital Computer
https://ia600300.us.archive.org/27/items/nasa_techdoc_19790073644/19790073644.pdf

Launch Vehicle Digital Computer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturn_Launch_Vehicle_Digital_Computer

Dr. von Braun (seated) examining a Saturn computer in the Astrionics Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturn_Launch_Vehicle_Digital_Computer#/media/File:WernherVonBraunAstrionics.jpg

U.S. Space & Rocket Center
https://www.rocketcenter.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntsville,_Alabama

IBM's page on the Saturn Guidance Computer
https://www.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/space/space_saturn.html

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Comments 3604 Comments

SmarterEveryDay
I would like to point out several things:
1. Luke Talley is awesome.
2. Every single frame of this video requires more memory storage than this memory module is capable of handling. Think about that.
3. On the second channel we talk about things like how they took into account gyroscopic precession with this bad boy. They also crashed this into the moon and used the signal as a way to figure out what the inside of the moon is like. It's a good video, you should consider watching it. ( https://ufl.ae/videow/6cCA6yIPiQi )
4. This is not the Apollo computer. This is the Saturn V computer. They're different. This steered the rocket.
5. People that support Smarter Every Day on Patreon are really cool and I like them a lot. ( https://www.patreon.com/smartereveryday )
Ken Haley
At 2:00, you are describing "core" memory, which was the type of memory used in most computers up to around 1975-1980, when semiconductor memory first entered the scene. I worked on an IBM 1620, a 1401 and others, including a minicomputer made by a company called Microdata, which all used core memory. (I'm 72.)

I still have three 8K memory boards from that Microdata computer. (Failure of this type of memory was common, so I decided to save boards when they were replaced.) I remember they were priced at $3,500 each back then, or around 5 cents/bit. At that rate, 16GB of RAM (128 billion bits), now commonplace in PC's, would cost 6.4 billion dollars (without accounting for inflation)! That's over double the entire Apollo program budget. (Good thing they didn't need 16GB.)

Just as shown in this video, I can see the little cores arranged on the grid of wires. I was amazed back then, and I still find it impressive today. Here's an interesting fact about core memory: In order to read a bit, the computer would actually write a zero at that location. A sense wire running through all the bits on that plane would detect a pulse if that location originally contained a 1 because reversing the magnetic direction would induce that electric pulse. A second cycle was then required to restore the bit back to a 1 (or leave it as 0 if no pulse was detected). This was known as "destructive" read, requiring two machine cycles. One cycle on the Microdata was one microsecond (1 MHz). A modern CPU running at 4GHz is 4,000 times faster. But one cool thing: if the computer lost power, core memory was preserved! It wasn't 100% reliable, but often, when the computer was powered back on after a power failure, it could continue running where it left off!

Anyway, I am wondering what to do with these memory boards. Right now, they're just gathering dust in my closet. Any ideas?
Micha Grill
Not gonna lie that ad at the end was pretty salty :P
Carlthehamster
ok now i love this episode because of linus and rockets xD
Gydo194
of course Linus likes the cooling system the most LOL
Oliver McIlwain
Why do surfaces get dark when wet?
mohammad ziad
And then a flat earther come and say the space is fake.
Eat Jat
747 dislikes. How ironic.
Nathan Weisser
This video is supposed to be about a modern computer nerd and a 60s computer scientist interacting with each other, but what I'm more interested in is Linus being on the same screen as someone with a native Alabama accent lol
Against NAZO!
But what's with technology a few years later?
Would the MOS 6502 Processsor of Comodore64 be enough to steer such a rocket?
Klippy Klop
very, very clever. Cut from a different cloth.
Lisa Johnson
Absolutely INCREDIBLE!!! I remember getting up early in the morning in the 1960's to watch a rocket launch on TV and it was an amazing feat back in the day. To see this "computer" that made that happy is mind blowing. These guys were amazing and it worked. Thanks for this very cool video.
donven33
Hey Dustin, I am a long time Audible client but still go and check out your recommendation everytime you make one. Just curious what else do you have in your Audible collection please?
Thanks in advance!
Astrowixa102 Elon
Saturn VRGB
AJ Google
I'd appreciate more audiobooks recommendations :)
mar sag
these guys who made it in the '60s are authentical heroes!
pawn pawnee
Flat earthers would like to disagree.
ghanzo
You can see the doubt building in Linus eyes, that the mission even happened.
Paul Rickett
DumberEveryDay still hasn't figured out that the Apollo program never went to the moon. Earth is flat!
Jammy Pockets
You get a free book on your first month of audible anyway, so what is the benefit of typing 'smarter'? Do you get an extra free book in your first month with this code?
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America's Iron Giants - The World's How did NASA Steer the Saturn V?- Smarter 2 days ago   12:48

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This is the story of America's massive forging presses built during the cold war used to build America's most advanced machinery - the Heavy Press Program. Modern airplanes, missiles, helicopters, turbines - all have parts made on these giant machines!

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