How to Make an SLA Finishing Station // 3d Printing How to Make an Adjustable Silverware Tray 2 days ago   11:43

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We got a new SLA resin 3d printer, so we made a finishing station to help clean up and cure the prints. Sponsored by CuriosityStream, for a free month, go to https://curiositystream.com/iltms and use the code "iltms"
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PEOPOLY MOAI 200 SLA PRINTER FROM MATTERHACKERS: https://www.matterhackers.com/store/c/peopoly?aff=7403
https://kit.com/iliketomakestuff/sla-finishing-station
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For this project, we are making a cabinet specifically made to wrap around our new SLA (Stereolithography Apparatus) printer from our friends at Matterhackers, the Moai 200 from Peopoly. We are using this machine to make some super-detailed prints for a collaborative project with Tested.com and Adam Savage to replicate the Apollo 11 Command Module hatch called Project Egress. This printer is very large, think minifridge sized. It isn't practical to sit it on a table and the top surface isn't large enough to be an adequate work surface. Our design will add a set of shelves beside the printer that will match its height and a tabletop that will span across the top of the two.

I cut the pieces out of 1/2" plywood on the table saw and assembled the 3-shelf unit with glue and brad nails. The height was based on the size of the printer so it may not be the same in your instance. I also cut a door that will fit inside of the top cubby. This door will close off the light from the curing area we made in the next section. The table top was placed on top of the shelving unit and brad nailed from underneath. The whole unit was set in place overtop of the printer and it looked great!

SLA printing works by curing liquid resin inside the printer. Once the print is complete it is covered with uncured resin and the part itself isn't yet fully cured. When the part is removed from the build plate, it needs to be rinsed with alcohol (we used denatured, but isopropyl works too) so that the extra liquid resin is removed. The build plate itself has to be cleaned of residual resin so that it is ready to use on the next print.

Because of the size of this large printer, the cleaning process requires a lot of alcohol. We needed a bath of sorts to clean the build plate and a rinse jar to clean the part. I got 2 plastic storage bins the same width as the build plate (so I didn't have to use too much alcohol) and poked holes in one of them. The idea would be that I could lift the holed bin up out of the other and it would act as a colander leaving the solid pieces in the top and the alcohol in the bottom.

For the part cleaning, Josh found a plastic storage bin that is made for keeping vegetables fresh. It has a clear plastic outer bin and a perforated basket on the inside with a lid. With this basket, we can dunk the part in the alcohol, lightly brush it with a soft-bristle brush, and easily remove it to dry. Both of these containers will be covered and set on top of the cabinet surface as part of the finishing station. We covered the top of the cabinet with come contact paper so that the resin and alcohol wouldn't reach the wooden surface, keeping it cleaner over time.

Once the part is dry from its alcohol bath, it still isn't finished. The resin isn't fully cured yet and to complete that process it needs to be exposed to ultraviolet light for 20-30 minutes.  The top cubby in the shelving unit will act as a UV light box equipped with a small light-activated turntable. The turntable allows every side of the part to be hit with UV light to maximize even exposure.

Josh order a strand of UV LEDs with an adhesive backing; the set came with a power adapter and an on/off switch. I cut a scrap piece of wood, covered it with aluminum ducting tape, and stuck the LED strip to it. I had to double the lights over creating a zig-zag path to cover the whole wooden sheet. To make the rest of the reflective walls inside the cubby, I used some left-over mirror tiles that were 12" x 12". To save weight, the door was covered in the same reflective aluminum tape and attached to the shelving unit with some face-mounted hinges. Now, when the light-activated turntable is placed inside and the lights are turned on, the part can rotate around and bask in the curing glow of 360 degree UV light.
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Comments 263 Comments

The P.I. Workshop
To see our 3d printed entry for Project Egress see it here https://www.instagram.com/p/BztWY1LAbDh/
Carl Bloom
What utility knife are you using Bob? Thanks. Love the channel and podcast.
KyleKatarn145
I'm not the most knowledgeable about resin curing but I think having the solar powered turntable in there, while an awesome idea, may not be doing your resin prints any good, unless you're willing to babysit them while they cure.


Everyone's already said their piece on the use of mirrors and aluminium tape, but I think your prints would be better served if they were put on a metallic, reflective oven rack inside the curing station, one with holes along the bottom. As it stands, if you put the print in like Bob does, every angle except for the bottom would be cured easily (aside from overhanging bits), with a metal rack you'll allow the UV light to bounce and hit most of your print from the underside giving it a much more even cure.


Still this is an awesome idea and I hope to be able to make one of these when I eventually get a printer of my own!
Crafty Sven
Hey Bob, great build. In case of that bust, you can print it straight on the platform so it comes out upside down, and then have 1-2 supports for the overhangs (like the ears).. that's a lot less work with removing the supports. Saves time and material. The model orientation shown in the video looks like the default software settings.
Also no need to wash the platform if it goes back to the resin.
Nicholas Josey
im just wondering if those leds have any conductive points points on the back or sides because aluminum conducts electricity and that could potentially short circuit
ThangMD
I'm I the only one that is bother that the strips aren't straight?
joshua morin
I love the idea.

But am I the only one who uses screws when building? I rarely use glue/nails.....
Vloging Challengers
Like you projects a lot! But edge banding shouts ikea:(
Johannes Röring
Cure-iosity stream bruh
DDHard
7:32 the new Dr.Strange movie looks cool
jasoncy31
Are you using IPA or denatured alcohol for the resin wash? My Form2 used IPA. Not sure about your printer.
Average Floridian
Kinda bummed this isn't a Solid Live Axle project for your truck, but I'll eventually get into 3D printing so I'll watch anyway. ;)
Nicole Hoskinson
wo
Nicole Hoskinson
wow
Antibody Entertainment
Hey bob, you should try MR clean or simply green and a ultrasonic bath to clean your resin prints, and or print bed. I cant remember who did a video on it, but it seems pretty dang effective and no need to brush your parts (for that oh so gooood finish lol)
Mickie
please never say “squirting out” ever again
Icemanmodeler
Good job but u have to move the curing station every time u need to level the printer assuming it has the same system as a regular Moai.
KING SKOBE
I’ve been watching you since I was I was 6 I’m now 11


You were a big part in my childhood creativity wise so thank you for making me the person I am today
Jake Goldberg
Hey Bob, mirrors would not be good for this project, because glass is not transparent to UV wavelengths of light. Since mirrors are a reflective surface behind a pane of glass I don't think mirrors would reflect UV light well. The best option for this project might be to line the walls with aluminum foil.
Intan payung
can you make a board games projects?
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How to Make an Adjustable Silverware Tray How to Make an SLA Finishing Station // 3d Printing 2 days ago   15:49

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We made a sliding silverware tray that is adjustable to fit your stuff!
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https://kit.com/iliketomakestuff/shop-safety-gear

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Our first task in making an organized silverware tray was to determine what kitchen utensils needed to be store in the drawer. My whole family use forks, spoons, and knives every day and we use larger serving and cooking spoons pretty frequently. Other rarely-used tools can be stored in another drawer. Armed with this line-up, I began to make arrangements to properly store each group of items in two separate trays. My plan is for the more-frequently used items to ride on top of a larger tray underneath.

The construction for this entire project began at the home center where I purchased 1/4" thick poplar boards. This method made be a bit more expensive than buying thicker stock and re-sawing it into thinner pieces, but these were ready to go. I made a simple box frame using the Incra Box Joint Jig and fit the four sides of the upper drawer together. I also cut the sides for the larger bottom drawer, but I added some thin dado slots for the moveable dividers to fit into. The bottom box was fit together using box joints as well.

For the vertical dividers, I cut more strips of the 1/4" poplar. These silverware walls could simply be spaced inside the drawer frames to match the utensil width, but in order for you to grab the forks and spoons comfortably, I needed to add a cutout. I marked out a cove on one of the pieces and tape all of the rest of the dividers to it. Doing this, I could then cut out the same curved shape on all of the pieces at once. I cut out the rough shape on the band saw, and sanded them together on the belt sander.

The walls on the upper tray were glued in place and the walls for the lower tray were fit inside the appropriate dado slots. The bottom shelf didn't actually need a bottom because it would sit directly on the cabinet drawer. To make a simple bottom for the upper tray, I glued on a panel made from the same 1/4" poplar.

I know I'm not the only person who is irritated with the odd organization in their silverware drawer. I hope this project inspired you to go get some simple materials to make a custom solution to a common problem.

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