Why China has become the world leader Populism is reshaping our world | The Economist 7 months ago   01:52

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China is the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases, using fossil fuels to drive rapid industrialisation. So why is it now investing billions of dollars in green technology?

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China is the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases. Its water, air and soil are heavily polluted. How did China become the world leader in clean energy?

China's rapid industrialisation has lifted millions out of poverty but has come at an environmental cost. Its growth relies on coal, the dirtiest fossil fuel. This contributes to high levels of air pollution in cities such as Beijing.

China's leadership sees pollution as a threat to social stability. Citizens have protested about pollution and poor air quality. The government is also concerned about the impact on health. It has launched programmes to clean up its environment and improve air quality.

The leadership recognises the dangers posed by climate change and sees the economic opportunities in developing renewable energy.

In 2015, China increased its solar capacity by 74%, making it the world's largest producer of solar power. In 2015 China invested $111bn in clean power. It plans to increase this to $361bn by 2020.

China is reluctant to give up coal but it is well aware of the costs. As America steps back from tackling climate change there are hopes that China will fill the gap.

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Comments 187 Comments

emi rumpf
*I'm taking a training course in solar panel installation, repair and maintenance. My instructor recommended this book [link here >>>**lovy.biz/qy48**  ] as an excellent resource along with the course. I'm finding it invaluable. By buying it through Amazon, I saved considerable money and received it very quickly.*
ikm64
Just another area where China has done all the Prep work for World domination. While the West vacillates and the leader of the free World has left reality for a brave new isolationist reality only he can see.
Art Silver Falls Art
We use to lead the world now we are so behind so many country's it's pathetic
Feng989
Some people, either hate China's guts, but they know China is doing well, or are clearly inbred/naturally dumb.
Techno Destination
Yeah great Job US
Since you are pulling out on climate action
Just hope that China do covers all your mess
Ryan Rodrigues
China is the next USA.
Easter Stedman
Really enjoyed your video. Let's check Avasva plans also
Quantium
Greenhouse gases dont cause smog. Most of the time it is nitrogen oxides, which is produced mostly the same way co2 is produced. Blaming co2 for the smog is completely wrong.
Tejas D
China impressed whole world with their growth but China need just one thing more to become superpower is "Democracy"
joseph liao
AMERICA is fucked up u guys have angry feminist, terrorists, flat-earthers, antivaccine parents and just stupid people in general. Your education system is one of the worst and your government is one of the most corrupted in history However I do hope America improves for the citizens, and america does have alot of potential
Moussaoui Ahmed
..........M
Debopriyo Nath
I am happy that China is doing good because they are not like like the U.S. who only care about economy
Kadin Hernandez
As electricity costs rise over time, uncovering methods to cut your electricity bill and generate your own power is increasingly essential. This is a producing power process “boma fetching unique” (Google it) to cut your electricity bill and see instant monthly savings.
samuel .w
中國有很多問題, 但也有很多成就. 但如果你帶着有色眼鏡, 或帶着思想框框去看, 就看不到這一切.
Boxiang Wang
Do you want to explain why there is Osaka in this vedio which is about China?
109ejg
This climate hoax is almost as good as war, eh?
Prince Wood
Large-scale use of wind energy and solar power is a big challenge to the grid regulation for its instability. But well developed and low-cost hydrogen fuel cell could be a solution in the future.
Harsimran Brar
Does anyone know what the source for the music used in the video is?
Raphael Fua
this looked like a populist propaganda video.
CTO Information
*thats why we think China is a country with responsibility and a far more reliable partner than the US.*
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Populism is reshaping our world | The Economist Why China has become the world leader 7 months ago   15:10

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From the streets of Turin to Silicon Valley, people power is taking the world by storm. With frustrations rising and the old order apparently crumbling, who really has the answers?

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December 2016 Italy's populist opposition is shaking up the establishment. They're days away from a referendum that could spell the end for the Italian government and make it the latest domino in the toppling international order.

Around the world populist leaders are connecting with voters fed up with politics as usual and exploiting anger at an establishment out of touch with ordinary people. But giving voice to people's frustrations is one thing, offering them real answers is quite another.

Five Star's anti-establishment message is resonating with voters. It is now Italy's biggest opposition party. The country has been crippled by recession and stagnating wages. With rates of inequality among the highest in Europe many people feel left behind by globalization and let down by political leaders.

Now the populists sense there may be an opportunity to bring those leaders down. A referendum on constitutional reform has become a vote of confidence in the ruling elite. Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has said he will resign if the country votes no. He's the latest politician to find himself in the firing line. Tonight, thousands of five-star supporters are gathering at a rally in Turin. Some are starting to ask what they might do with success.

Beppe Grillo has vowed to get rid of political parties but he certainly knows how to start one. Grillo's success has come through impassioned charges against the corrupt elites and global forces he blames for Italy's woes but five stars leaders may soon have a harder note to hear. A question of how they would tackle unemployment and inequality.

Two days after the rally Italians overwhelmingly voted no in the referendum. Prime Minister Renzi made good on his promise to stand down. It's another victory for populism as across the world charismatic leaders defy expectations. They're finding success selling deceptively simple answers to difficult questions. They almost always blame the failings of free trade and mass migration for rising inequality but is this the right target?

Few cities are immune to the uneven impact of globalization.

The latest venture from a San Francisco startup has the potential to turn one of America's most iconic industries on its head. Last year Uber paid $680 million for Otto, a company whose technology could fundamentally change trucking forever. It allows a truck to drive down a highway with nobody at the wheel. The company claims it could save the industry billions of dollars a year, reduce emissions by a third and eliminate the driver errors that cause up to 87% of truck crashes. But this bright sounding future has a dark side. A series of studies have found technology, not globalization, to be the biggest driver of inequality in developed countries. There were three and a half million people employed in trucking in America and with their industry seemingly the next in line for automation many face an uncertain future.

As inequality grows in Western democracies, wealthy California has become one of the most economically unequal states in America as technology has displaced many lower skilled jobs.

An alienated public turned on the establishment because it failed to provide answers. As some tech giants become as powerful as that establishment, it's a lesson they're starting to learn. So they're going back to school.

For too many people in western democracies progress is still something that happens to other people. Wealth does not spread itself. An underclass appears beyond help, finding a way to reconnect with them and provide an alternative to populism will be at the top of the agenda for the political and business leaders of tomorrow

THE AGENDA explores the defining questions of our time and seeks out the stories, solutions and the personalities who might just hold the answers. Discover the mould-breakers experimenting with new ways to approach some of the modern world's most fundamental issues; find out what happens when bold ideas and real life collide, and meet the leaders whose thoughts and actions are themselves helping to shape the agenda.

Series One of The Agenda: People Power gets to grips with the rise of populism and what lies behind it.

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