Why General Motors Left Europe How Plant-Based Milk Flooded The Market 1 day ago   10:31

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In 2017, General Motors, the largest U.S. automaker, with brands like Chevrolet, Cadillac, and Buick made one of its boldest moves in its history. It sold its European Opel and Vauxhall brand to the French automaker PSA, known for brands such as Peugeot and Citroen. It was the end of an era for GM, which had first ventured into Europe nearly 90 years before.

GM left Europe after 20 years of losses, but why did the largest U.S. automaker leave such a big market? Did it simply fail?

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Why General Motors Left Europe
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Comments 3998 Comments

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Why do you think GM failed in Europe?
Glenn Oropeza
I can start by saying that the Chevrolets sold in Europe (except for the Corvette) weren't real Chevrolets! They were Korean made weenie mobiles or rebadged Daewoo cars! These cars hurt the reputation for not only Chevrolet but all of the American brand cars! What GM should have done is copy Ford's expertise in selling cars in Europe! Ford has so much experience because they were in Europe after World War 2!
Chivariak Khus
GM was smart. Europe will lead the way with renewable energy, which is still in development. Having an enormous infrastructure based on carbon burning vehicles will only become a greater risk with less and less potential for growth. So sell it off, retrench, and invest in renewable energy driven by profits from North America and other profitable areas.
Pat Mason Mason
No one wants to drive them like the USA.
Mike Zerker
The real reason is because GM makes unreliable vehicles... Time and again we see low reliability ratings from CR, and others. They will continue to do poorly in any market until they improve that metric!
Nigel Dowdell
US cars are not popular.
Ato Nympha
America is has a very high quality racism NOT high quality cars.
Ato Nympha
So the Ford in Europe is really American Ford?
Paul Gagnier
Mary Cun Barra T
Indrek Vilms
GM killed SAAB. Fools.
Mxr Wxl
To do well in Europe American auto manufacture’s has to make the vehicle the same size as what’s already there’s as competitors. GM North American product is just to big for Europe.
Mark Cross
Who is this guy they are interviewing. He’s clueless! There is no market for big trucks in Europe. Gm failed because it’s euro line was uninspired and dull. Ford and especially the focus and fiesta are huge sellers. They aren’t going anywhere as they’re the best in class. Opel/Vauxhall’s wasn’t by a long way.
Hemant Chawla
Their cars were crap compared to German cars that too for not much less money.
Patriot
Because they can't compete with German cars. duh If they were not so insolvent from giving all the top brass huge bonuses they would try and buy a German car company out. however I think the Germans are too smart for that? GM can't stay focused, they want instant profits so they keep changing instead of continuing to refine and improve there cars.
Ding-Dong Dunnit
Simple answer: because gm cars are made from loads of plastic and bail-out money
Guenzburgh Dcl
Silly and random excuses, the truth is that most large US businesses hire extremely bad management for European operations, why? I assume its corporate politics, they dont want overseas operations to be successful
John Michael
Much of the comment in this is plain incorrect and viewed through a telescope from the US. Like may American organisations they assume that Europeans will want the poor quality vehicles available in the US. Ford and GM made a living for years by selling cars to fleet buyers, who ran them for 3 years and sold them cheap. That market disappeared a number of years ago virtually overnight with the spread of leasing. There the lease price reflects the likely resale price at the end of the lease as well as purchase, maintenance etc. Suddenly Ford and GM offerings were at the bottom of the heap because not only were they poor quality the true cost of ownership is high. A smart company would have revisited its offering and worked at improving it, but they have not, but have gone down the cost cutting route making their products less reliable, more prone to rust and fast decreciating. And by the way the vehicles are not cheap but are priced at the same area as the better built better designed competion. GM have gone, will Ford follow? Probably.
Franky Duschek
Yes please keep gm in the US, not good here in Europe
andy andy
because europe is used to reliability and luxury. two things gm will never understand. as a master tech of twenty years. i sincerely hope gm is forced into full bankruptcy. they make junk and their designs only get worse and worse as decades progress.
Golden Retriever
This is probably conspiratorial but I honestly think top gear may have something to do with it too

They have TRASHED American cars

And while they’re no longer on air anymore the damage has been done

And while the video did say American cars were a hard sell in Europe anyway I’m just saying top gear may not have helped matters
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How Plant-Based Milk Flooded The Market Why General Motors Left Europe 1 day ago   07:18

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Alternative meat might be having a moment. Beyond Meat's trading debut quickly became the best-performing IPO of 2019. But alternative milk has been around for a lot longer, and it's forced the $107 billion dairy industry to evolve.

consumers have their choice between almond milk, rice milk, oat milk, hemp milk, coconut milk and soy milk—you get the idea. Americans are drinking less and less milk now that store shelves are flooded with more and more options.

Paul Ziemnisky, EVP of global innovation at Dairy Management Inc., which represents dairy farmers, told CNBC in a phone interview that fluid milk, however, remains in 94 percent of households. He added that the dairy industry is finding ways to innovate through new flavors and products like Fairlife, a high-protein milk brand distributed by Coca-Cola.

"The plant-based guys like to poke and grab at just one number of a category, but we have strong pockets of growth," he said, adding that Fairlife has seen strong revenue numbers. "It's not just white milk anymore — it's milk with valued-added features."

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How Plant-Based Milk Flooded The Market

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