Culture Eats Individuality For Breakfast The Science of Dubstep | James Humberstone 2 days ago   17:37

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When we don’t understand someone else’s behaviour in the workplace, or even in our partner we put it down to personality or intellect, but seldom do we interpret the behaviour as being culturally influenced. Culture, Monique says “is like wearing sunglasses, after a while you forget they’re on your head” similarly the forces of culture can be rendered invisible to us.

Monique describes through stories the pervasive influence our cultural backgrounds have on many facets of our life, right down to the way we eat breakfast. She speaks to the importance of developing cultural self-awareness and the application of the cultural intelligence model to harness the asset that is our diversity in organisations and interpersonal relationships.

Monique Toohey is a Psychologist, Cultural intelligence advisor, lecturer and author. In 2005 she founded Nasihah Consulting Group – Northern Psychology Clinic and she lecturers in Multicultural counselling at the Australian Catholic University. Monique is passionate about intercultural education and has found her niche embedding the cultural intelligence framework across a variety of platforms, from mental health and wellbeing, family violence, social services, justice, leadership programs, communications, policy and project design to engage culturally diverse clients and consumers.

Monique has a number of publications, including the book Without You: Rising above the impact of an abusive relationship. She has been seen on ABC TV Hungry Beast, Lateline, featured in The Australian, The Age, The Herald-Sun, ABC & 3AW radio, 2016 Melbourne Writer’s Festival and delivered the 2017 Tasmanian Annual Peace Trust Lecture. Monique is a Psychologist, Cultural intelligence advisor, lecturer and author. In 2005 she founded Nasihah Consulting Group – Northern Psychology Clinic and she lecturers in Multicultural counselling at the Australian Catholic University. Monique is passionate about intercultural education and has found her niche embedding the cultural intelligence framework across a variety of platforms, from mental health and wellbeing, family violence, social services, justice, leadership programs, communications, policy and project design to engage culturally diverse clients and consumers.

Monique has a number of publications, including the book Without You: Rising above the impact of an abusive relationship. She has been seen on ABC TV Hungry Beast, Lateline, featured in The Australian, The Age, The Herald-Sun, ABC & 3AW radio, 2016 Melbourne Writer’s Festival and delivered the 2017 Tasmanian Annual Peace Trust Lecture. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
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Comments 4 Comments

Serap FILIZ
Sometimes we can say it’s the personality of an individual. However as you said Monique communicating & behaving in a certain way can be due to their cultural, historical & global communities. There’s food for thought about our subconscious connections with culture/s in a intermingled fashion.
Thank you for your insightful talk.
asianhippy
What a load of BS. I will always treat people as individuals. I don't care what their culture is. I want people to treat me as an individual and not as a part of a collective.
Yellow Devil
this is schwachsinn
Tansel Ali
This is ever so important, especially in the day and age we live in right now! Congrats once again on your talk.
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The Science of Dubstep | James Humberstone Culture Eats Individuality For Breakfast 2 days ago   18:07

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The theme for TEDxOxford in 2016 was “find X”. In his talk “the Science of Dubstep”, James Humberstone proposes that if this and future generations are going to “find X”, every nation needs to revolutionise education and develop cohorts of workers who can think abstractly. A composer, technologist, musicologist and music educator, Humberstone claims that music is the most abstract of all the arts and that technologically rich, culturally appropriate musical training could lead that educational revolution, turning the focus away from high stakes standardised testing and toward engaging and inspiring student-centred learning. Along the way he explains how incredible human perception of sound is, and composes a 12-tone dubstep song with the help of the TED audience!

As a composer, technologist and teacher, James Humberstone believes that music education can lead all education through the challenges of the 21st Century. After all, there is no more experiential, creative, child-centred subject than music – or so he claims. A trained ‘classical’ composer, James migrated to Sydney, Australia in 1997 and has also worked in the fields of music software, education (with children and adults of all ages), and as a musicologist. Today he is a lecturer in music education at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, and remains an active composer. His recent musical output included a permanent electro-acoustic installation at the Australian National Maritime Museum on board a retired destroyer and a submarine. In 2016 James is collaborating on a Hip Hop album, and composing a song cycle. He has also just released the University of Sydney’s first (free) MOOC, “The Place of Music in 21st Century Education” at www.coursera.org.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

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